Easter Sunday Daffodils

As well as being Easter Sunday, today is Sue’s birthday so we have enjoyed a fairly lazy day with lots of good, home-cooked food. By 6pm lethargy had set in but we just managed to force ourselves to take a short drive to Stapenhill and walk the riverside path.

We were rewarded by the welcome sight of these drifts of daffodils in the evening sunlight – a perfect reminder of the hope of new beginnings that Easter brings.

“Sometimes I do get to places just when God’s ready to have somebody click the shutter.” Photographer, Ansel Adams.

Happy Easter

Take a seat – With words

“Tell a man that there are 300 billion stars in the universe and he will believe you, but tell him that a park bench has wet paint upon it and he will have to touch it just to make sure”



Here are the words of some bench plaques actually found around the UK, mainly affixed by pranksters, but then again they could be genuine…

‘In memory of Roger Ucklesby who hated this park and everyone in it.’


‘In memory of Rene Lauener (1916 -1993) who liked to sit down.’


‘This bench is dedicated to the men who lost the will to live whilst following their partners around the shoe shops of Chester.’


‘They Could Do With A Bench Here.’


Take a seat – In spring, summer, autumn or winter

Truly, the bench is a boon to idlers. Whoever first came up with the idea is a genius: free public resting places where you can take time out from the bustle and brouhaha of the city, and simply sit and watch and reflect. – Tom Hodgkinson


“There is only one way to understand a lonely bench in a park: Sit on it; watch whatever it is watching; listen whatever it is listening to! Sit in spring, sit in winter, sit in summer! To understand something deeply, you need to live its life!” – Mehmet Miriam Ildan

“No king has a throne more beautiful than a bench covered with the autumn leaves!” – Mehmet Murat Ildan

No takers!

Take a seat – With remembrance

Memorial benches at our local peace park.


At the nearby National Memorial Arboretum this Polish Armed Forces Memorial may also be used as a bench. It pays tribute to the Polish Forces personnel who gave their lives in the 2nd World War 1939-1945. Breaking the Enigma Code – A plaque on the memorial describes how Polish mathematicians broke the enigma code used by the Germans.