Filey

A week by the sea – day 3

With all the COVID-19 restrictions in place we have decided that we will not be taking a holiday this year so now is a good time to delve into the archives and organise a virtual tour of a few English coastal resorts. Welcome on board and enjoy the views! We would normally sign off our postcards with the hackneyed ‘Wish you were here’, but at the moment it isn’t appropriate. You may not wish to be ‘here’. If that’s the case, don’t succumb to temptation of travelling when you know it’s much safer to stay at home.

Day three – Greetings from Filey

Walks along the beautiful clean beach with firm flat sand, views of Flamborough Head, the cobble landing and lifeboat station, Filey Brigg,

Glen gardens. As mentioned in another post, this has to be our favourite beach for walking. Filey

Whitby

A week by the sea – day 2

With all the COVID-19 restrictions in place we have decided that we will not be taking a holiday this year so now is a good time to delve into the archives and organise a virtual tour of a few English coastal resorts. Welcome on board and enjoy the views! We would normally sign off our postcards with the hackneyed ‘Wish you were here’, but at the moment it isn’t appropriate. You may not wish to be ‘here’. If that’s the case, don’t succumb to temptation of travelling when you know it’s much safer to stay at home.

Day two – Greetings from Whitby, North Yorkshire

Memories of the abbey, 199 steps, the harbour, Captain Cook’s statue, the whalebone arch and fish and chips. No visit to Whitby is complete without the almost obligatory fish and chips. Several establishments vie for the title of ‘Best fish and chips in Whitby’, or even the UK. This one pictured is Mister Chips in Church Street but other contenders include The Magpie, Trenchers, Hadleys, The Fisherman’s Wife, Royal Fisheries and dozens more.

You just have to accept that some days you are the pigeon (or in this case seagull), and some days you are the statue.

Bamburgh

A week by the sea, day 1

With all the COVID-19 restrictions in place we have decided that we will not be taking a holiday this year so now is a good time to delve into the archives and organise a virtual tour of a few English coastal resorts. Welcome on board and enjoy the views! We would normally sign off our postcards with the hackneyed ‘Wish you were here’, but at the moment it isn’t appropriate. You may not wish to be ‘here’. If that’s the case, don’t succumb to temptation of travelling when you know it’s much safer to stay at home.

Day one – Greetings from Bamburgh

We start our virtual trip around the coast at Bamburgh castle in the north east of England. It is one of the few castles still in private ownership and inhabited. The photographs were taken on a very brief detour from the A1 whilst driving from Edinburgh to Durham.

The Wise and Foolish Builders. “Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock. But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.”

Let Nature be your teacher

6x4 strawberries backJust over a week ago we took our grandchildren strawberry picking at Scaddows Farm, a few miles from us. We arrived soon after they opened and followed the well organised Covid-19 precautions, including hand sanitising upon entry. When we reached the fields it was clear that after weeks of ‘home schooling’ many young families were enjoying a morning outdoors. You could almost see the relief on the faces of parents and children alike. And who could blame them? What better classroom than this?

I left this post as a draft, hoping to find a suitable quote about strawberries, but surprisingly nothing came along, even with the help, or lack of help, from google. (If you find one please feel free to comment). Then out of the blue Suzette at Suzette B’s blog posted the quote ‘Come forth into the light of things, Let Nature be your teacher’ by William Wordsworth.

I searched the quote and discovered that it’s from The Tables Turned. I always need help interpreting poetry so I found a useful analysis of it. Basically Wordsworth is saying don’t double in size by sitting at a desk pouring over boring books. Get outside and look and listen. Nature is full of wealth and wisdom. You can learn more about humanity, good and evil from a tree than from a sage. Go out, ready to learn with “a heart that watches and receives”.

By the way, the strawberries tasted as good as they looked!

The Tables Turned by William Wordsworth

Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books;
Or surely you’ll grow double:
Up! up! my Friend, and clear your looks;
Why all this toil and trouble?
 
The sun above the mountain’s head,
A freshening lustre mellow
Through all the long green fields has spread,
His first sweet evening yellow.
 
Books! ’tis a dull and endless strife:
Come, hear the woodland linnet,
How sweet his music! on my life,
There’s more of wisdom in it.
 
And hark! how blithe the throstle sings!
He, too, is no mean preacher:
Come forth into the light of things,
Let Nature be your teacher.
 
She has a world of ready wealth,
Our minds and hearts to bless—
Spontaneous wisdom breathed by health,
Truth breathed by cheerfulness.
 
One impulse from a vernal wood
May teach you more of man,
Of moral evil and of good,
Than all the sages can.
 
Sweet is the lore which Nature brings;
Our meddling intellect
Mis-shapes the beauteous forms of things:—
We murder to dissect.
 
Enough of Science and of Art;
Close up those barren leaves;
Come forth, and bring with you a heart
That watches and receives.

Spring

Just over a year ago I wrote about ‘Mid May Landscapes’.  Mid-May Landscapes

Here is this year’s offering of such photos, again taken at Rosliston Forestry Centre, part of The National Forest. Rosliston Forestry Centre

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Spring 2020The car park and centre are closed due to the pandemic restrictions but access to the footpaths is still possible for walkers. It is a minor disadvantage not being able to park at the centre (they have promised to extend out annual car park pass!) but the big plus is that there are very few people there so it is good to enjoy the peace and quiet at this wonderful time of the year, especially in such good weather.

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Bluebells the movie!

You’ve had the postcard, now see the movie!

Over 30 years ago at our camera club, I always enjoyed the ‘audio visual’ evenings. A guest speaker would arrived armed with two 35mm projectors, carousels of slides and a reel to reel tape recorder. They had a device, often home made and always manually operated, which enabled them to switch from one projector to the other and achieve some magical effects with fades, disolves and ‘third images’ between slides. The images were usually accompanied by some suitable music, commentary or sound effects and these evenings were always popular and well attended.

Similar effects can now be produced from the comfort of ones own home with digital photos and AV software and then shared with a much wider audience. This one is certainly not a Spielberg epic but I hope you will enjoy a few quiet moments with the bluebells.   First time linking to a YouTube video – hope this works!

Link below… (forgot to say turn up the volume)

Bluebells 2020

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Bluebells postcard backIt is exactly a year since I first posted about bluebells, and here we are again – bluebell season. The difference this time is that we are in coronavirus lockdown so we have been walking close to home and enjoying a nearby small wooded dale.

P1090587My post last year stated  – ‘Here in the UK we have more than half of the world’s bluebells and you can see them in woods up and down the country each spring. They are powerful magnets for photographers and artist alike, although strangely not always the easiest of subjects to photograph and capture the colour accurately’. The photographs this year were taken in the little known local bluebell woods. There is no car parking nearby and consequently they are only used by nearby residents and they do not attract people from other parts of the town. This year they are being used by local families were the parents are clearly on the ‘home schooling’ duties. What better classroom?

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Last year I also wrote ‘Native bluebells are protected by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. It’s against the law to dig up bulbs in the wild and landowners aren’t allowed to dig them up to sell them either’. This year we have our 3 and 4 year old grandchildren with us and whilst it is a pleasure to see their joy and excitement when seeing bluebells it can be quite difficult to stop them picking them and taking some home. I remember one shortened and simplified version of the official Countryside Code was ‘Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints’.  Today, I only took photographs but the ground was dry and firm so I didn’t even leave any footprints.

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A perfect spring day – or is it?

St Mark's front

St Mark's backWe continue to follow the official advice and guidance and this week have taken several walks starting from home rather than jumping in the car and driving a few miles first. It does have its advantages. We see things which we would not normally see, have a chat with people we probably wouldn’t usually talk to, and I have taken the opportunity to update photographs of local landmarks and places of interest.

One such landmark is that of our parish church, St. Mark’s, Winshill. It was built in 1869 at a cost of £6000. Like several churches in Burton on Trent, it was provided by one of the town’s influential brewers, in this case John Gretton. The cynics may ask if they saw such gifts as their ticket to heaven, but generally speaking the brewers such as Bass, Ratcliff and Gretton were great benefactors, and often provided facilities which were of great benefit to the people of the town.

The peaceful scene, on a perfect spring day, is a welcome ray of sunshine midst the encircling gloom.

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