Tuesday trees

“Trees have personalities. They’re individuals. Tall or bushy, thick or thin, well-established or struggling, they’re like people, each with its own character. Sometimes as I walk around, I look at people and try to work out what sort of tree they are. Just for fun of course.”

Eddie Askew, Love is a Wild Bird

“In nature, nothing is perfect and everything is perfect. Trees can be contorted, bent in weird ways, and they’re still beautiful”. Alice Walker

Sunday Psalm

Psalm 19

1 The heavens declare the glory of God;
the skies proclaim the work of his hands.
2 Day after day they pour forth speech;
night after night they reveal knowledge.
3 They have no speech, they use no words;
no sound is heard from them.
4 Yet their voice goes out into all the earth,
their words to the ends of the world.
In the heavens God has pitched a tent for the sun.
5 It is like a bridegroom coming out of his chamber,
like a champion rejoicing to run his course.
6 It rises at one end of the heavens
and makes its circuit to the other;
nothing is deprived of its warmth.

Tuesday trees

Surely all photographers and artists like trees? Whatever the season they have so much to offer, from the young leaves and vibrant colours of spring, the fullness of form and structure in the summer, the browns, yellows and golds of autumn or the complex yet graceful skeletal branches in winter.

These photographs were taken a few years ago when a particularly strong hoar frost added yet another aspect to the trees.

“Trees have personalities. They’re individuals. Tall or bushy, thick or thin, well-established or struggling, they’re like people, each with its own character. Sometimes as I walk around, I look at people and try to work out what sort of tree they are. Just for fun of course.”

Eddie Askew, Love is a Wild Bird.

Monochrome Monday

Here is the first of a series of posts on the theme of ‘alliteration days’. I have noticed that on several blogs I follow, fellow bloggers will publish ‘Wordless Wednesday’ or ‘Friday Flowers’ and the like. So with my self-imposed challenge and attempt to beat lockdown lethargy, winter woes, and January jadedness, I’ll start the week with Monochrome Monday.

When walking around Stapenhill Gardens and Woodland Walk by the river Trent I am frequently drawn to this Victorian gothic-style shelter. It is in a quieter and less well known part of the walk and yet still close to the footpath along the side of the river. It may well date back to the 1860s when the woodland walk was first laid out as one of the earliest public parks in Burton on Trent. It has been suggested that it was built from stone from the 12th century medieval bridge which was replaced in 1864.

The Victorians were fond of ‘follies’ but at least this structure has a practical purpose and has provided welcome shelter from the rain to countless walkers over the years. To me it has a slightly eerie atmosphere even in daylight. I wouldn’t be surprised to find a hermit in there one day!